Stray Dogs

15 Sep 2014 08:00

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Reviews:
Tomas Hachard(NPR): In its ~ numerous evocative moments offers images that elect stick in your mind even longer than they stay on the screen.
Stephen Holden(New York Times): [A] sour, humorless exercise in Asian miserablism …
Danny King(Village Voice): An of the rarest kind, compassionate magnification of the minutiae of stand by-to-second existence (brushing teeth, counting wealth).
Jake Cole(Film.com): If this is Tsai Ming-Liang's final film, he's leaving the cinema more remotely along than he found it.
A.A. Dowd(AV Club): Tsai's latest is paltry and human and primal-a yell from the gutter, and a survival lie about life on the fringe, in which a family of four ekes loudly an existence one day and scavenged collation at a time.
David Rooney(Hollywood Reporter): The counsellor's austere minimalism has eternally been suspended between the mesmerizing and the distancing, and in his latest mark, the concentration on elliptical observation, mood and texture signals an almost without fault rejection of narrative.
Matt Zoller Seitz(RogerEbert.com): A obscure and deliberately prolonged series of tableaus nearly the fragility of flesh and the smallness of spirit, among other things.
Tony McKibbin(The List): General Tsai admirers may pick earlier films like Vive L'affair of gallantry and The River, but this is restrain rigorous cinema at its most unquestionable.
Jamie Dunn(The Skinny): Stray Dogs is every existentialist study of human endurance presented in brace acts. Both are spectacular.
Tony Rayns(Film Comment Magazine): Tsai may well be cinema's foremost connoisseur of frustrate: the best chronicler we have of the temps mort between social reality and darkly comic dreams of despair.
Andrew Schenker(Slant Magazine): Tsai isn't fabrication a social-problem film here, and his criticism of patriarchal control is secondary to his picture of unbearable psychic conditions.
Scott Tobias(The Dissolve): It's right achingly sad, to the point to what the walls themselves, streaked black from irrigate damage and neglect, appear tear-stained.
Nigel Andrews(Financial Times): This pellicle's poetry goes straight to the centre of circulation and solar plexus.
David Jenkins(Little White Lies): Every missile in this film instantly etches itself put ~ the memory, but you'll own to find a special place for the last three which are some of the most extraordinary ever committed to pellicle.
Lee Marshall(Screen International): Still a sonorous film, a sort of recession-themed cinematic emphasis poem reminiscent of some of the in addition out-there cinematic forays of Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul, that keeps on evolving once the pain of the viewing actual feeling has subsided.
Oliver Lyttelton(The Playlist): If no quantity else, you're left by a masterclass in directing, and a pellicle that anyone who's staid about cinema needs to make the time to beware.
Robbie Collin(Daily Telegraph): Every shot of Stray Dogs has been built through utter formal mastery; every sequence exerts one almost telepathic grip. This film could be delivered of been beamed to Venice from one more planet.

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Two Night Stand

15 Sep 2014 08:00

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Tusk

15 Sep 2014 08:00

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Reviews:
Clark Collis(Entertainment Weekly): Tusk lands termination to Human Centipede territory in palpable-out-ness – a warning, not a wail – but it also has a genuinely haunting property …
A.A. Dowd(AV Club): Tusk grew used up of a podcast joke, and it shows: There's a fabrication-it-up-as-we-go-at the same time quality to the movie, which seems moreover satisfied with its own nuttiness to be truly transgressive.
Wesley Morris(Grantland): Weird is every one of this movie is, when it could gain been a lot more.
Joshua Rothkopf(Time Out New York): Too of a ready tongue and self-satisfied to count in the same manner with a success, yet too personal to fully dismiss, Tusk-which features Fleetwood Mac's annoying coke-fueled walk in a steady manner of the same name-is changeable as a seal.
Scott Foundas(Variety): Smith has delivered a left-surface surprise that ranks among his to a high degree best work …
Thelma Adams(Yahoo! Movies): A disgusting, creepy, and enthralling metamorphosis movie that toys through the audience's ideas of shuddering and retribution, while presenting a stretch out of verbal and visual jokes with a great turn by Michael Parks. Kevin Smith is back!
Luke Y. Thompson(Topless Robot): At its with most propriety, Tusk gives me hope that [Smith] be possible to grow. At its worst, it makes me despair that he can't.
Henry Barnes(Guardian): It's to the degree that self-referential as any of the superabounding director's duds, but it's refreshingly self-deprecating likewise.
Ed Gonzalez(Slant Magazine): It suggests the crush possible gene splice of a mailed Terrance and Phillip South Park what is seen, Fargo's blithe condescension, and the smuggest of Quentin Tarantino pastiches.
Jason Gorber(Twitch): Tusk sinks its teeth into hi~ telling in a way that's the pair entertaining and delightfully disturbing.
Mark Bell(Film Threat): Michael Parks continues to test his exceptional talent, versatility and willingness to get along with you all out for whatever role he takes without interrupti~…
Tim Grierson(Screen International): Pleasingly twisted and disrespectful, Tusk succeeds as an exercise in WTF grotesqueness.
Drew Taylor(The Playlist): "Tusk" combines autobiographical elements, spooky at the eleventh hour-night B-movie influences and a deeper thematic inquisition of the nature of storytelling, to appoint something wholly unique and twisted.
Chris Bumbray(JoBlo’s Movie Emporium): Batsh*t crazy, moreover in the best way possible. An exciting of the present day chapter for Smith, who seems reinvigorated and at the apex of his game.

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Tracks

15 Sep 2014 08:00

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Reviews:
Melissa Maerz(Entertainment Weekly): Like Davidson herself, this luxuriant adaptation from director John Curran (The Painted Veil) is famous for accomplishing so much with in the same state little.
Kiva Reardon(Globe and Mail): The pellicle is 112 minutes, but feels being of the cl~s who long and as arduous as Davidson's actually being-life trek.
Cath Clarke(Time Out): Mia Wasikowska gives some unflashy, moving performance. As the months end, her skin burned and peeling, she begins to examine like the blistered Australian landscape.
Linda Barnard(Toronto Star): Mia Wasikowska plays Australian Robyn Davidson, a loner who makes Greta Garbo watch like an extrovert, in John Curran's beautifully lensed dramatic refreshment of Davidson's 2,700-kilometre trek across the Aussie desert in 1977.
Mary Corliss(TIME Magazine): John Curran's thin skin, starring Mia Wasikowska, captures the ravishing empty state of the landscape and the elemental perils facing a powerful young woman.
David Rooney(Hollywood Reporter): A tour of arduous physical challenges and not to be reckoned spiritual rewards is evocatively rendered in this exquisite adaptation.
Prairie Miller(NewsBlaze): Mia's intensely grueling deed distills abundant muted fury from the with reference to something else minimalist material. Not unlike say, Kevin Costner's homogeneous weighty existential pilgrimage, here conveyed in her avow Dances With Camels in the Australian wild.
Katherine Monk(Canada.com): Tracks has every one of the drama of a female to come-of-age movie — without all the play of a female coming-of-a hundred years movie. It's a grateful change, and one that feels just sweeter after a long walk end the dunes.
Mark Kermode(Observer [UK]): John Curran's dramatic yet intimate recreation of Davidson's poem journey makes for an engrossing watch, albeit one that unfolds at a walking hasten.
Rich Cline(Contactmusic.com): The pure story behind this movie just on the point makes up for its oddly ninny. tone, which never quite captures both the grandeur of the Australian Outback or the deeper emotions of the people on-screen.
Michael Leader(Film4): Wasikowska – during the time that ever – dazzles as that rare deed in contemporary cinema: the independent fertile adventurer.
Geoffrey Macnab(Independent): Tracks is a industrious and beautifully shot account of the contriver Robyn Davidson's real-life fare by camel across the Australian outback.
Donald Clarke(Irish Times): Ever redder of nose, ever more bedraggled about the hair, Wasikowska, exclusively of much dialogue, invests the character by complexity, intelligence and charisma.
MaryAnn Johanson(Flick Filosopher): Romantic in the grandest sense, a visceral and hypnotic experience of idealistic aspirations replace against the desolate beauty and jeopardy of the Outback.
Brian Viner(Daily Mail [UK]): I'm to the end of time loath to use the expression 'travel by sea of self-discovery', but in that place is a spiritual dimension to Tracks that makes it other thing than just a long walk to the ocean.
Peter Bradshaw(Guardian): It is ~y attractive, heartfelt work, and Wasikowska carries it with grace.
Henry Fitzherbert(Daily Express): Ultimately it feels greater degree of documentary-like than drama; a celebration of the local landscape and tillage rather than a compelling narrative.
Emma Simmonds(Little White Lies): Mia Wasikowska talks to camels in this well-meaning but flat-footed desert adventure.
Janina Matthewson(Sky Movies): Director John Curran occasionally relies too much on cliché, such as montages of Robyn walking end sand overlaid with a map of her road, but overall creates a subtle, nuanced contemplate at Robyn's ordeal.
Matthew Turner(ViewLondon): Captivating positive-life drama enriched by stunning cinematography, a studious, inspirational script, a superb central work by Mia Wasiskowska and three estimable camels.
Antonia Quirke(Financial Times): Vast, darkness-dreamish, touching.
James Mottram(Total Film): Right into disrepute to the sunburn and chapped lips, Tracks is ~y authentic desert drama. A little greater degree psychological insight wouldn't have gone amiss, though.
Siobhan Synnot(Scotsman): With no thing at stake, John Curran's earnestly gloomy biopic hasn't much to endeavor except parched voiceovers, painfully slow child/parent flashbacks, sunburn and humps.

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The Pirates

08 Sep 2014 07:14

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A Walk Among the Tombstones

08 Sep 2014 07:14

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This Is Where I Leave You

08 Sep 2014 07:14

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Reviews:
Todd McCarthy(Hollywood Reporter): Everyone to this place is obnoxious to one degree or some other, but enough of it amusing in every appalling sort of way that it's austere to not be at least in some measure won over by the brashness of the compulsively uncensored town ~ and behavior.
Scott Foundas(Variety): A sprawling ensemble dramedy that starts out like a filled-tilt sit-com and gradually migrates to a courtyard of genuine feeling.
John Hazelton(Screen International): There are sufficiency mildly raunchy moments to string together into a fun trailer, but during the term of the most part This is Where I Leave You is a amiable dramatic comedy that makes limited employment of the combined talents of Jason Bateman, Tina Fey and Jane Fonda.
Catherine Shoard(Guardian): This is Where I Leave You is totally lovable, utterly unmoving filler given a major shot in the arm by its hurl, people it's simply a animal gratification to watch, even with the fawning feeling they're better than this.
Tim Robey(Daily Telegraph): "It's OK to roar, honey. Or laugh. There is none correct response," Fonda says two times in the movie. We're begging to be perceived one or the other.
Edward Douglas(ComingSoon.snare): Shawn Levy's cast frequently makes up for the routineness of the film's overused premise.
Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): In Shawn Levy's hands, the predictably grueling Jewish usage of sitting shiva becomes the inducement of comedy and high family dramatic literature.

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Second Opinion: Laetrile at Sloan-Kettering

01 Sep 2014 11:30

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Reviews:
Anita Gates(New York Times): Mr. Moss's message is clear, shrewdly edited and particularly interesting.
Graham Fuller(New York Daily News): Though a documentary, it's dramatic enough to subsist reminiscent of "The Insider," the whistleblowing thriller relative to Big Tobacco.
Michael Nordine(Village Voice): Like numerous company docs with activist undertones, Second Opinion tells a potentially interesting story in a bland way – a fixed camera up~ its main subject, who recounts the novel detail by detail.
Kam Williams(Baret News): If you've at all times wondered whether the cancer industry is constantly interested in developing a cure against the disease, you might want to hindrance out this eye-opening expose.
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): A fascinating, inspection-opening and enraging exposlbeit its talking heads approximate is somewhat dry. Dr. Ralph Moss makes with respect to a very interesting subject.
Louis Proyect(rec.arts.movies.reviews): Fascinating dignity of the moral and scientific failings of New York's famed cancer hospital and research center, in what place I worked in the 1980s.
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): Portrait of a discreet, articulate, and courageous whistle-blower.
Eric Monder(Film Journal International): Eric Merola does some admirable job of giving a platform to Ralph W. Moss…admitting the director fails to add various other corroborating voices. Still, Second Opinion's biggest bounden duty might inspire concerned viewers to detect out more about the drug
Charles Bramesco(The Dissolve): The top-up Merola purports to have unearthed in the present state is certainly scandalous, but the film suffers from a general lack of according to principles authority.

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The Remaining

01 Sep 2014 11:30

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Warrior King 2 (The Protector 2)

31 Aug 2014 07:02

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Reviews:
Bilge Ebiri(New York Magazine/Vulture): If you conception the higher profile might have prompted Jaa to up his enterprise, prepare to be disappointed.
Daniel M. Gold(New York Times): Again through the elephant?
Elizabeth Weitzman(New York Daily News): It's a dishonor to see both actor and guide play things so safe.
Ignatiy Vishnevetsky(AV Club): Cheese is fair-minded about the only thing The Protector 2 has going as being it.
Nick Schager(Village Voice): Eschews distasteful gore for a sly goofiness that makes Jaa approach across like a real-life Looney Tunes marked traits.
Stephen Danay(Under the Radar): Do yourself a regard with ~ and stick with the original.
Jeffrey M. Anderson(Common Sense Media): Completely laughable — as well as agonizingly dumb.
Drew Taylor(The Playlist): Sure, it's simple, but it's also wildly entertaining and sprinkled through some nice emotional beats. As lengthy as Tony Jaa keeps losing his elephant, we'll adhere to showing up to watch him follow it down.
William Bibbiani(CraveOnline): It may not have existence the kind of film for what one. Tony Jaa will one day have ~ing remembered, but The Protector 2 is at smallest consistently fun.
Kevin Carr(7M Pictures): This isn't a capital movie, and it's not while strong as the original. However, to the degree that a follow-up, it's di~ery a fun ride.
Glenn Kenny(RogerEbert.com): Think near how bad the acting and plotting obtain to be in order to distill the impinging of a Tony Jaa battle exhibition. If you know a little here and there Tony Jaa, that's ~ly of hard to imagine. I apprehend. But trust me. Or don't.
Witney Seibold(Nerdist): The Tony Jaa medium The Protector 2 has some awesome warfare and feels – in a good usage – that it has escaped from 1987. It's ~atory not that great, but it certain is entertaining.
Daniel Eagan(Film Journal International): Action junkies may not thought the movie's weak script, line of motion and acting, but even they pleasure complain about the generally poor war sequences. Non-genre fans will permit this one slide right by.
Dan Schindel(Movie Mezzanine): Tony Jaa is hush an impressive fighter, and he's once more surrounded himself with other equally overpowering martial artists to duel, but the effort is squandered.
Matt Prigge(Metro): It's a maddening film, one that exploits [Tony] Jaa's abilities person moment then second guesses them the nearest.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-ray.com): A aspect best suited for the fast-accelerate button, where viewers can race to the most excellent parts without having to deal through what passes for suspense in this funny follow-up.
Scott Tobias(The Dissolve): The bigger The Protector 2 gets, the farther it gets away from Jaa's basic appeals [...] Clearing a apartment flush with faceless bad guys is the kind of Jaa does, but otherwise, less is greater amount of.
Chris Bumbray(JoBlo’s Movie Emporium): Suffers badly from compare to THE RAID. The inept JAWS 3D name FX don't help. A back-to-basics approach would have been much better.
Matt Donato(We Got This Covered): The Protector 2 is a afflictively misguided action abomination filled with homely visuals and confused characters, failing to showcase ~ one genre competency in the least atom.
Fred Topel(CraveOnline): CGI Jaa? Say it ain't such.

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