Around The Block

30 Jul 2014 17:31

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
David Rooney(Hollywood Reporter): Every unwedded development in the Wood family's draught trajectory is telegraphed, and these actors deserve to be in a less emotionally bogus historic.
Joe Leydon(Variety): Well-intended nevertheless cliche-ridden.
Prairie Miller(Critical Women): Hamlet In The Hood. Petite Christina Ricci displays a large heart, as a teacher in molest with her inner maternal instinct. And disaffected Aboriginee teens dramatizing in a culturally conscious produce, the alienation at the heart of Hamlet, who knew.
Andrew L. Urban(Urban Cinefile): There are in ~ degree false notes here, and there is nay whitewash, either (if you'll grace the expression); it's a benefit story well told and beautifully performed, supported ~ means of a contempo soundtrack and seamless design. Australian cinema at its exist
Louise Keller(Urban Cinefile): All the throw is excellent with special mention to Matt Nable, whose minimalist playing as Liam's criminal male parent is outstanding, providing the film's emotional highlight

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

Beneath

28 Jul 2014 07:34

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): A among the shades-ground but slightly above average hatred movie
Rex Reed(New York Observer): Halfway end, the movie loses its grip without interrupti~ logic and truth, and you come to a dead lock believing it's based ~ward anything other than the years the adviser spent in his youth, marching in the Greenwich Village Halloween Parade.
Calum Marsh(Village Voice): Beneath exhausts the appeal of its thinly sketched characters almost as soon as they're trapped side by side in the mine's unforeseen occasion bunker …
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): f in that place were double features nowadays, The DescentBeneath have existence the underwhelming B movie.
Todd Jorgenson(Cinemalogue.com): The film relies on too many contrivances and generic scare tactics, and there's not enough character depth to establish any emotional alliance.
Brian Tallerico(RogerEbert.com): When does a severe, cheap horror movie becomes something additional offensively horrible? When it pegs its generic folly on real-life tragedy and becomes exploiting. see the verb.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-ray.com): Unable to pick out between the horrors of a destroy disaster and a ghostly force using the manner of life as puppets. It's disappointing to bring into being that either direction will yield hardly any thrills.
Maitland McDonagh(Film Journal International): If Beneath isn't like good a movie as the force-shattering The Descent, well, few are. But Beneath aims instead of the same ambitious mix of material and psychological terror and does a neat job of not showing its transmit until it's good and handy.
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): More arduous than the lack of scares is the revery of even one remotely interesting emblem.
Chuck Bowen(Slant Magazine): The pellicle is impersonal and populated with wisps of characters who be lost most of the running time raving around in the dark yelling at individual another.
Rob Hunter(Film School Rejects): Beneath ague off its generic trappings early forward to deliver a fantastic blend of chills and thrills, and the script keeps viewers guessing in a wont that never feels manipulative or paltry.
Staci Layne Wilson(Dread Central): A cheerful thriller for a dark night of Netflixing.
Mark H. Harris(About.com): The assign delivers believable performances throughout.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

Child Of God

21 Jul 2014 07:28

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
Richard Corliss(TIME Magazine): So, did altogether that industry pay off? With Child of God (pictured), from Cormac McCarthy's 1973 strange, the answer has to be: Eh.
Stephanie Zacharek(Village Voice): Time and again I found myself looking at a wobbly reach of somebody's slouched shoulder, or a not-very-interesting left head, wondering what information, exactly, these visuals were intended to transfer.
Jon Frosch(The Atlantic): Child of God is projectile with rough, raw energy and steeped in a suitably infecund Southern atmosphere. It's also a chore to sit through.
David Rooney(Hollywood Reporter): There's a unearthly purity to the storytelling even at its untidiest, that enables Franco to remain true to the holy spirit of McCarthy's vernacular lyricism.
Justin Chang(Variety): Franco has emerged by an extremely faithful, suitably raw yet still relatively hemmed-in adaptation that compares favorably with his earlier films, yet falls destitute of achieving a truly galvanizing portrait of social and sexual deviance.
Chase Whale(Film Threat): In the first appearance scene, an unnamed narrator claims Lester is, "a babe of God much like yourself it may be." If this is true, jokes up~ the body us because only Satan could fruit a man like Lester Ballard.
Travis Hopson(Examiner.com): Child of God is one more ambitious effort by Franco, but in that place's a reason why others be favored with had so much difficulty bringing it to the mask.
Kent Turner(Film-Forward.com): This is a tough take a bribe for, a heavy-duty Southern gothic that makes the Coen brothers' No Country notwithstanding Old Men seem lightweight.
Caryn James(James in successi~ screenS): Franco's powerful process, directed with discipline and intelligence, captures McCarthy's satirical darkness. It reveals the humanity buried below animalistic behavior.
R. Kurt Osenlund(Slant Magazine): To in fact appreciate the film, one needs to gaze past James Franco's scantiness of formal poetry and focus forward Scott Haze's performance and Cormac McCarthy's themes, which, given the great might of the one and the other, isn't exactly hard to answer the purpose.
Lee Marshall(Screen International): While remaining fair faithful to the story, Franco ~ or other manages to inject a note of humour into the fib of a man who comes transversely more as maladroit misfit than woful sociopath.
Oliver Lyttelton(The Playlist): The good thing feels sort of tossed facing, like it was made by thin skin students over a couple of weekends.
Xan Brooks(Guardian): Multi-hyphenate renaissance man James Franco has finally delivered the chattels with this great, grisly Cormac McCarthy appropriateness

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

Calvary

21 Jul 2014 07:28

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
Cath Clarke(Time Out): Part Father Ted, concern Tarantino, this is a wickedly laughable black comedy, all fatalism and gallows humour, by a beating heart.
Eric D. Snider(Film.com): McDonagh, because of all his agility as a scrivener, stumbles in fleshing out the recital.
Justin Chang(Variety): Brendan Gleeson gives a literary work of monumental soul in John Michael McDonagh's masterful come-up to 'The Guard.'
Matthew Toomey(ABC Radio Brisbane): Calvary is a wonderfully uncomfortable film.
Matt Glasby(Flicks.co.nz): When it's from hand to hand, you'll find a thoughtful hush has descended on the hearing: a cinema turned, briefly, into a ecclesiastical body.
Evan Williams(The Australian): Much of Calvary is saturnine, much of it shocking. But it's not in fact about religion or the church. It is a laudation of the human spirit, and force of ~ not be easily forgotten.
Paul Byrnes(Sydney Morning Herald): It's some immensely moving film, and a brilliant one for the way it tackles ecclesiastical issues without irony. Run, don't walk.
CJ Johnson(ABC Radio (Australia)): Each [person] becomes a "suspect" since the murder that is yet to have existence committed, but caring "who's gonna translate it" becomes trying as the performances alternate wildly, from passable (Chris O'Dowd) to astonishingly corrupt (Isaach De Bankole).
Jim Schembri(3AW): After the straight-brilliant buddy-cop black comedy shenanigans of The Guard, quill-driver/director John Michael McDonagh dials everything up like he deploys darker humour and explores darker souls in the observable serio-comic Calvary.
Louise Keller(Urban Cinefile): Plaiting strands of dramatic literature with gentle black humour, McDonagh has created a hard platform for the superlative Gleeson whose soulful, grounded carriage is a compelling guide for a plenteous insight into the small coastal village inhabitants' sins and virtues
Damien Straker(Impulse Gamer): Colourfully written and sometimes bizarre, I found Calvary to subsist fascinating and crafted with skill and a purposeful take notice of.
Tom Clift(Concrete Playground): Tonally, emotionally and spiritually compounded, Calvary comes highly recommended.
Simon Foster(FILMINK (Australia)): McDonagh has found a wonderfully satisfying balance between his skills being of the kind which a writer of intimate, intelligent narratives, and the greater themes that rise in hostility before the demons of his homeland.
Blake Howard(2UE That Movie Show): Calvary determine shake you up; it's at the same time that audacious as it is beautiful.
Simon Miraudo(Quickflix): Even in a fire-arm as dark and sombre as Calvary, the self-referential, anarchic McDonagh's truth remains inscrutable. His uncanny talent in the same proportion that a tightrope-walking filmmaker, however, is in the same proportion that clear as Christ on the sullen.
Matthew Pejkovic(Matt’s Movie Reviews): A film not only of deep religious refutation, but one that also looks at the essence of sacrifice as atonement for the sins of others.
Dominic Mill(We Got This Covered): Calvary treads worryingly terminate to the theater work of John Michael McDonagh's junior sibling, and never quite lives up to of that kind lofty standards.
Rich Cline(Contactmusic.com): After the 2011 murky comedy The Guard, Brendan Gleeson reteams with writer-director John Michael McDonagh instead of a darker comical drama grappling by issues of faith and forgiveness.
Siobhan Synnot(Scotsman): This is ~y honourable attempt to pull together a close attention on Ireland and its religious disillusion, and share of a planned trilogy for Gleeson and McDonagh.
Xan Brooks(Observer [UK]): Your with most propriety advice is to sit back, depend on to your rosary beads and take delight in the ride while it lasts.
Ed Whitfield(The Ooh Tray): Its questions stay by you long after the end credits hold left you to your troubled thoughts.
Laurence Phelan(Independent): McDonagh's script is a feigned bit of writing with the orderly structure and mythical resonance of a fondness play, but idiosyncratic and funny in the whole of of its detail.
Geoffrey Macnab(Independent): There is a strong whiff of Beckett-like absurdism and ungenial humour in the film, which benefits from a feat of wonderfully droll dignity and bemusement from Brendan Gleeson at the same time that a priest confronting his mortality.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

Llyn Foulkes One Man Band

18 Jul 2014 07:17

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
Gary Goldstein(Los Angeles Times): It's inspiring to see a unique talent finally get his just title, even if – or maybe because – it took until his late 70s to get in that place.
Sheri Linden(Hollywood Reporter): It's a portrait of the artist as a charmingly obstinate septuagenarian.
Scott Foundas(Variety): An illuminating likeness of the artist as a cabalistic, self-doubting, obsessive-compulsive perfectionist.
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Mr. Foulkes overwhelms this documentary, what one. buys into his one-man coterie a little too much.
Daphne Howland(Village Voice): While his obsessiveness seems neurotic, and attention this film is not always comfortable, it also seems to be entirely part of the process.
Landon Palmer(Nonfics): …a compelling, wary, and sometimes hilarious depiction of the innumerable factors weighing down a paintbrush like it struggles to meet a canvas.
Jonathan Romney(Film Comment Magazine): A relate to slapdash, repetitive, indulgent, and yet compelling, in the main because its subject is so troublingly, excessively peculiar.
Louis Proyect(rec.arts.movies.reviews): The finest documentary near an artist I have ever seen. Folkes is ~y original and every minute spent in his crew will remind you why true geniuses be in possession of a hard time in an creation of beauty world more commodified than McDonalds recklessly food.
Mark Bell(Film Threat): Llyn Foulkes One Man Band is a description look into the life and cunning of a tremendous artistic mind.
Chris Klimek(The Dissolve): Llyn Foulkes: One Man Band might be too bitter to sit through, on the supposition that it wasn't enlivened ~ the agency of a soundtrack of songs composed and performed ~ dint of. Foulkes himself.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

The Class Of ’92

15 Jul 2014 07:06

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
Stephen Carty(Flix Capacitor): The Class Of '92 potency be slightly limited in terms of seek reference of the case, but for fans of football – and Manchester United, in own – it's a must-take heed.
Nev Pierce(Empire Magazine): An absorbing documentary on the point a football fairy tale – engrossing in opposition to any admirer of the beautiful enterprise, but for United fans, it's unmissable.
Stefan Pape(HeyUGuys): This film deserves to be seen in the cinema considered in the state of a result, because as Eric Cantona says himself, "it's the make ~ script".
Andy Lea(Daily Star): It's in this way entertaining even Liverpool fans will gulp it up.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

Where Was God?

14 Jul 2014 07:43

Movie Info

Photos:

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

A Most Wanted Man

14 Jul 2014 07:43

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
Justin Chang(Variety): Philip Seymour Hoffman plays a German tidings operative in Anton Corbijn's steadily absorbing John le Carre adaptation.
Todd McCarthy(Hollywood Reporter): This admirably textured thriller radical in Eastern immigrant-laden Hamburg enjoin prove absorbing to attentive audiences internationally who don't need everything spelled out to them …
Kate Erbland(Film.com): As perpetually, le Carre subverts the spy genre in a greater way.
Ben Rawson-Jones(Digital Spy): The mournful loss of Philip Seymour Hoffman resonates through Anton Corbijn's challenging mete ultimately rewarding thriller.
Chris Fyvie(The Skinny): Philip Seymour Hoffman dominates to the degree that German spy-master Gunther Bachmann in Anton Corbijn's decayed-school espionage yarn, based on John le Carr39;s 2008 new.
Hannah McGill(The List): Hoffman is a lovely fit as one of Le Carre's dilapidated, disappointed anti-heroes, whose post-ideological bafflement having regard to the point of what he's doing feels altogether convincing.
Don Simpson(Film Threat): The narration gets severely bogged down in the boring minutia of scout work, showcasing the smallest details of Gunter's investigations, aggregate the while muddling up the draught and any sense of character unravelling.
Jason Gorber(Twitch): It is forward Philip Seymour Hoffman's shoulders that plenteous of the film sits, and his disheveled, cigarette-fueled German discover character provides another of his matchless sad-sack characters that he brings to the protect better than pretty much anyone.
Dominic Mill(We Got This Covered): Slow-paced and brooding, A Most Wanted Man won't be to everyone's tastes, but that it's a must care for for Le Carrans.
Travis Hopson(Examiner.com): Another skillet boiler with a great cast and a story that emphasizes facts, figures, and disposition while leaving character in the background.
Cory Everett(The Playlist): Not while arty as The American or Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy or in the same manner with soapy and quickly paced as its faint screen counterparts, A Most Wanted Man is left somewhere in the middle.
Jordan Hoffman(ScreenCrush): some interesting yarn, but while watching it I was powerless to shake that it was in such a manner … freaking … slow.
Anthony Kaufman(Screen International): Like the most profitably works of le Carrit takes you up~ a sly and acerbic trip, replete of both triumph and failure.
Chris Bumbray(JoBlo’s Movie Emporium): Strangely rough but Philip Seymour Hoffman is a le Carre in the course of nature.
Xan Brooks(Guardian): It's a professional ~en-school espionage outing, intricate as clockwork and acted with relish by the ever-watchable Hoffman.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

I Origins

14 Jul 2014 07:43

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
James Rocchi(Film.com): Lighter and looser than Another Earth, yet the script still strains.
Joshua Rothkopf(Time Out New York): Persuasive sci-fi tech oral intercourse, soulful romance and an earnest blow at metaphysics combine in director Mike Cahill's made bright second feature.
Peter Debruge(Variety): The pellicle amounts to a lousy sort of sorcery show, schematically pulling strings to verify its own points.
Todd McCarthy(Hollywood Reporter): A saucy, original and exceptionally fine second aspect from former Sundance award-winner Mike Cahill.
Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): Imaginative sci-fi narrative with a metaphysical dimension.
Dan Schindel(Movie Mezzanine): Laughably explores system of knowledge and faith.
Travis Hopson(Examiner.com): Through the lens of philosophical knowledge, Cahill and Marling explore the pattern that something unexplainable and greater than totality of us is out there.
Amber Wilkinson(Daily Telegraph): Despite his informal and easy camerawork, which generates more lovely moments between Ian and Sofi, Cahill's narrative jolts along in fits and starts.
Rodrigo Perez(The Playlist): …I Origins is the full-formed expression of all of [Mike] Cahill's aspiring ideas. It also cements him for the re~on that the real deal; a filmmaker who desire hopefully continue to take us to places well stocked of mystery, wonder and awe.
Dominic Mill(We Got This Covered): I Origins is a half-bizarre mix of sci-fi, parable and romantic drama that, while repeatedly engaging, never really holds together.
Jordan Hoffman(ScreenCrush): Half-assed storytelling and dead performances
Tim Grierson(Screen International): This sci-fi fantastic drama is consistently engaging and unpredictable, extending in emotional impact as its mysteries startle to slowly assert themselves.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS

Postman Pat: The Movie

09 Jul 2014 07:44

Movie Info

Photos:

Reviews:
Sherilyn Connelly(Village Voice): One of the in the highest degree family films to come down the turn~ this year, and not just inasmuch as this year has also brought us The Nut Job and Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return.
Ben Kenigsberg(New York Times): Viewers unencumbered ~ means of nostalgia will probably see this zippy, occasionally funny movie as no more distracted or pop-culture-addled than the average multiplex fodder.
Elizabeth Weitzman(New York Daily News): The 6-year-experienced I watched it with summed it up exactly: "It starts out fun if it be not that then it's kinda grievous and scary. And sorta boring, likewise."
Sandie Angulo Chen(Common Sense Media): Cute British risk should make little ones laugh.
David Noh(Film Journal International): The script is a utterly confused morass of mixed intentions, often forsaking the kind of would really appeal to a young infant in favor of cynical attempts to stay their parents awake.
Emma Johnston(Total Film): Postman Pat – lovably voiced through Stephen Mangan – is catnip to nippers, who'll love the songs (Ronan Keating takes through the whole extent of to voice those), fear the scary robot cats and joy the ever-cheery mailman on his march.
Mark Kermode(Observer [UK]): Despite the imperfect knowledge of knowing nods to the parents (jokes in various places James M Cain and Lost in Space) this has petty to entice the over-sixes and overflow to scare the under-fives …
David Edwards(Daily Mirror [UK]): Boasting spectacularly shoddy animation and gags that wouldn't amuse a dim-witted five-year-antiquated, this is one to be thrown extinguished with the junk mail.
Brian Viner(Daily Mail [UK]): The bewitching opening sequence evokes Walt Disney's pioneering act of enlivening at the start of Pinocchio. And in that place are some lovely jokes for mums and dads. But surely they could have crafted a fable truer to the TV original …
Charlotte O’Sullivan(This is London): There are almost worse ways to spend 88 minutes of your life.
Simon Reynolds(Digital Spy): Postman Pat's repute may be on the marquee, nevertheless ultimately this doesn't be moved very much like him at altogether.
Allan Hunter(Daily Express): Kids are going to aphrodite Postman Pat: The Movie even grant that adults might find it sacrilegious in its management of their beloved childhood favourite.
Mike McCahill(Guardian): Disa be possible to't really satirise society's homogenised fare-freakery when his songs feature Ronan Keating and his act of enlivening looks scarcely finished.
Patrick Smith(Daily Telegraph): Postman Pat: the Movie doesn't achieve a stamp of approval.
Stefan Pape(HeyUGuys): Kids devise love it!
Andy Lea(Daily Star): Parents resolution have definitely have sat through a destiny worse. But I'm not positive what the average four-year-primitive will get out of it.
Siobhan Synnot(Scotsman): Mild collation purely for children, apart from Pat's bedtime version of The Postman Always Rings Twice.
Fionnuala Halligan(Screen International): Basic, superficially garish computer animation.
Matthew Turner(The List): Predictably sufficiency, the film replaces the charming point-motion animation of the TV concatenation with CGI, but at least they be under the necessity the good grace to make a crank about it.
Andrew Pulver(Guardian): Perhaps the throng of killer robots wasn't the space to go.

  • Digg
  • Del.icio.us
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Twitter
  • RSS
Page 1 of 48612345...102030...Last »